<html><head></head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>In *BSD making separate slices for non root file systems is a very good idea for hardening and debugging service configurations (such as the 'nodev','nosuid' mount options... 'nosuid' has exposed some qmail issues I never considered prior to not having this option).</div><div><br></div><div>As well slicing and dicing also becomes academic if you use the full size of the drives (also allows you to move the slices around by adding drives/space). &nbsp;Lock step change management style environments would prefer slicing and dicing to keep the allocation size as small as possible and limited to known/a priori style resource management and allows one to grow an FS in place (such as you gave /var 99% of your disk when you could have used 20% and grown other slices based on host specific growth patterns).</div><div><br></div><div>Then again if your hosts are internal then simpler is better and I agree with Adam there (though I would put swap on sda2 and sda1 on root but that's largely academic and Adam's probably right depending on hardware layout).</div><div><br></div><div>When I design servers I try and fit the shipping OS into 10GB or less and leave the rest for variable growth mounts like /tmp,/var,/opt,/home. &nbsp;In a pinch, being able to grow or zone say /var/log to a new slice allows you to keep /var in place but lessen pressure /var/log is placing on that slice. &nbsp;Anyways that's my two cents (refunds not available).</div><div><br>--&nbsp;<div>Sean (mobile)</div></div><div><br>On 2011-06-10, at 1:43 PM, "Adam Thompson" &lt;<a href="mailto:athompso@athompso.net">athompso@athompso.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div><div></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#1F497D;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--><div class="WordSection1"><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">I’ve taken to making my life as simple as possible:<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">/dev/sda1 = swap<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">/dev/sda2 = root (including everything else)<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">No LVM, no RAID (assuming HW RAID or VM instead).<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">I haven’t run into a system that can’t boot off a large root partition in quite some time, and I don’t have any systems running root FS types that aren’t bootable, either.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">The fewer things I have to remember about how a system is configured, the better, from my perspective.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">-Adam<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"> <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><a name="_MailEndCompose"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></a></p><div style="border:none;border-left:solid blue 1.5pt;padding:0in 0in 0in 4.0pt"><div><div style="border:none;border-top:solid #B5C4DF 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 0in 0in 0in"><p class="MsoNormal"><b><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;">From:</span></b><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;"> <a href="mailto:roundtable-bounces@muug.mb.ca">roundtable-bounces@muug.mb.ca</a> [mailto:roundtable-bounces@muug.mb.ca] <b>On Behalf Of </b>Kevin McGregor<br><b>Sent:</b> Wednesday, June 08, 2011 19:21<br><b>To:</b> MUUG Roundtable<br><b>Subject:</b> [RndTbl] Partitioning in Linux<o:p></o:p></span></p></div></div><p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal">Well, not really partitioning. I know how to do that. At work today, the question of how to set up some Linux servers arose. To put it in some kind of context, when I install Ubuntu Linux (server), by default it creates a small /boot partition, the creates a LVM partition with a / ext4 partition and a swap partition inside of that.<o:p></o:p></p><div><p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal">Is that optimal? Recommended? Some would say that /home, /tmp, /var and others should reside in separate partitions/filesystems. Discuss. :-)<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal">Thanks for any input!<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal">Kevin<o:p></o:p></p></div></div></div></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Roundtable mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:Roundtable@muug.mb.ca">Roundtable@muug.mb.ca</a></span><br><span><a href="http://www.muug.mb.ca/mailman/listinfo/roundtable">http://www.muug.mb.ca/mailman/listinfo/roundtable</a></span><br></div></blockquote></body></html>